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Discovering the White Mountain Petroglyphs

White Mountain Petroglyphs

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Photo: Discovering the White Mountain Petroglyphs

White Mountain Petroglyphs Turn the Pages of Wyoming’s Ancient Storybook

Discover the White Mountain Petroglyphs, where you will find a unique version of Southwest Wyoming’s history told through etchings in the sandstone walls of White Mountain. 

The Plains and Great Basin Indians who lived in this area (roughly 200 to 1,000 years ago) left behind a legacy of their lifestyle in the form of hundreds of fascinating carvings. Whether your interests are photography, history or hiking, you can enjoy all of them at this incredible, sacred site.

A Historical Legacy

White Mountain is apart of the Green River Formation which was formed by Lake Gosiute over 30 million years ago. If you search the base of White Mountain, you may be able to find shells from another era.

Located in the Upper Wasatch formation, the White Mountain Petroglyphs are a permanent reminder of the American Indians that called Sweetwater County home. With a 300-foot cliff face as their canvas, the area’s earliest-known human inhabitants created rock art that tells the stories of a time when bison and elk hunts were a way of life.

Anyone can learn about Southwest Wyoming’s history in the pages of a book or with a click of the mouse. But to visit this remarkable site gives you the chance to view the live stories told by those who lived it.

Visitor Info

Head up U.S. 191 about 10 miles north of Rock Springs. Turn right at CR 4-18 (at the sign that reads Petroglyphs, Sand Dunes, Boar’s Tusk), then left at CR 4-17, and drive about 14 miles on the dirt road until you reach the White Mountain Petroglyphs sign. Turn left onto the rougher dirt road and drive about 2 miles until you reach the BLM parking lot. From here, you’re on foot for ¼ mile on a packed foot trail to the petroglyphs. 

Disclaimer: This is a true “off the grid experience” cell service is limited! Make sure you have extra water, and a high-clearance, 4 wheel-drive vehicle with thick tires (and a spare tire) to traverse the dirt roads. Let someone know where you are headed and when you plan to return.

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